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Leadership and People Management WSQ (LPM WSQ)

The LPM WSQ framework is designed to chart corporate leadership capabilities and shape a road map for leadership development for business leaders and managers in Singapore, thus contributing to sustaining our national competitiveness into the future.

Level 3

This programme will enable individuals to build strong and productive work relationships in teams. It covers participation in networks, developing team cohesiveness and resolving conflict.

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This programme will enable you to develop your skills as a team leader. It covers effective communication, promotes leadership in decision-making and how to develop and maintain your professional competence.

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This programme will enable you to work effectively as a team leader, to develop your team members’ skills and to encourage your team members to be more effective. It covers identifying skill development needs, how to address these skill needs and motivating your team members to develop their skills.

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This programme will enable you to implement change processes within a workgroup. It covers identifying opportunities for innovation and the implementation of changes to work practices and continuous improvement processes.

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This programme will enable you and your team to plan for and achieve results. It covers interpreting and implementing plans, establishing performance contracts and monitoring your team’s performance.

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In a thriving forward-looking company, visionary leadership is the responsibility of all in managerial and supervisory roles. This programme enables you to be an inspiring facilitator and motivator who can share your vision with others. You can deliver your vision to others easily through story telling, whether it is a story of success or failure. In order for employees to be motivated through storytelling, three steps need to be taken: Tell the Story, Act the Story and Live the Story. Therefore this programme is structured into three modules in nine chapters:

  • Module 1: Tell the Story
  • Module 2: Act the Story
  • Module 3: Live the Story

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Level 4

The role of a manager in a multi-tasking and multi-disciplinary environment is very demanding. To meet these challenges, you need to leverage on your team members’ strengths and ensure synergy within and between teams. This can be achieved through internal and external networking and building good workplace relationships.

It is also important for you to be sensitive to workplace cultural diversity when building relationships. Conflicts, whether positive or negative, are inevitable at the workplace. Whilst positive conflicts can be beneficial it is of paramount importance to know the sources and consequences of negative conflicts. Solving such delicate issues can be time consuming and it can be detrimental to organisations and individuals if not properly solved.

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“Enable People” is a 2-day learning programme designed to empower leaders with the necessary skills and expertise to bring out the best in their teams. This programme draws from the latest academic research and market practices to help you develop your team members to become high performing, happy and healthy individuals.

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Leaders not only lead but also transform their people into high-performance teams. They coach and facilitate their teams to work together to achieve higher productivity. They do not walk ahead of them nor whip them from behind; leaders work alongside their teams.

This programme addresses the skills and knowledge required to lead the implementation of organisation strategies at operational levels. It covers facilitating the implementation of strategy, promoting compliance with corporate governance requirements and providing direction to others.

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We live in an age of unprecedented business opportunities. With proper and deliberate strategic planning, individuals like you can enhance your organisation’s growth to becoming a market leader within its industry. To achieve success, you will need to begin by acquiring key knowledge in the development and implementation of plans through a proficient management of resources made available to you. Critically, your ability to monitor and reward your team for achievement of goals will continue to maximise your value and create an eventual competitive advantage for your organisation over its competitors.

 

 

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Anticipating and managing change are critical elements of management and individuals must learn to play their role in this process. The “Manage Change” course is a simulated executive Corporate Planning environment, where you will be immersed in a real-time planning scenario, developing resources, using research and learn to build up your personalised implementation & communication plans.

 

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Peter Drucker, management guru, coined the phrase “Managing Oneself” as a key personal competence needed by professionals to be effective in the present information and post-information economy. In particular, it is up to you to stay engaged and productive, continuing to contribute to your organisation’s goals and social good. As a modern professional you need a deep understanding of your personal aspirations, values and strengths. Only through combining self-knowledge with an appreciation of how to work with others, can you make your greatest contribution.

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Level 5

The people you employ can make or break your business – which is why you put in place a robust recruitment process. However, nurturing your people in the business is just as important. While conventional training usually generate passive response from your people, as these courses are often work-centric, developing people through teaching them to manage themselves will ensure a positive reception as it starts from within.

This programme focuses on enabling learning and development for people as individuals – which extends the range of development way outside traditional work skills and knowledge, and creates far more exciting, liberating and motivational opportunities – for people and for employers.

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Engagement is building relationships and putting these relationships to work to accomplish shared goals. It isn’t just about getting more clicks or likes on Facebook – It’s a deepening of relationships that builds partnerships and collaboration as a means to create economic and societal values. Companies that know how to deeply engage employees, partners, customers and other key stakeholders in their work have insurmountable strong advantage over other firms.

Recent research suggests that high-involvement work practices can develop the positive beliefs and attitudes associated with employee engagement, and that these practices can generate the kind of discretionary behaviour that leads to enhanced performance. Simply put, employees who conceive, design and implement workplace and process changes are engaged employees.

Although improved performance and productivity are at the heart of engagement, it cannot be achieved by a mechanistic approach which tries to extract discretionary effort by manipulating employees’ commitment and emotions. Employees see through such attempts very quickly; they lead instead to cynicism and disillusionment. By contrast, engaged employees freely and willingly give discretionary efforts, not as an ‘add on’, but as an integral part of their daily activity at work. The key is to be able to know how to supercharge your employees.

 

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Those who have successfully implemented strategic plans have often reported that involving teams at all levels in strategic planning helps to build a shared vision, and increases each individual’s motivation to see plans succeed.

Clarity and consistent communication, from mapping desired outcomes to designing performance measures, are essential to success. Successful leaders have often engaged their teams by simply telling the story of their shared vision, and publicly celebrating large and small wins, such as the achievement of milestones. To ensure that the vision is shared, teams need to know that they can test the theory, voice opinions, challenge premises, and suggest alternatives without fear of reprimand.

Implementing strategic plans require leaders who can lead through inspiration and coaching, rather than command and control. Recognising and rewarding success, inspiring, and modeling behaviours are more likely to result in true commitment than the use of authority, which can lead to resistance.

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We all know the challenges that come with organisational change and innovation. Depending on the source of change, it is well documented that 70-85% of all projects and programmes requiring people to adapt to a new way of doing things fail. Change is constant and organisations will continue to spend millions of dollars on things associated with change only to have change come at them at a higher speed, and the unaccounted cost of poor change management is far greater than the direct cost.

People get frustrated, burnt out and begin to adopt change resistant behaviours that thwart future initiatives and innovation. This resistance is rarely understood and hardly ever assessed. Worse yet, companies lose customers, don’t establish competitive advantages and miss opportunities for business growth that are often not measured.

As a leader, you are asked to help your staff move successfully through change & innovation.  You are often “accountable” and your performance assessment is frequently tied to your ability to ensure the new way of doing things is adopted successfully. So how do you navigate through change that is increasingly complex and against seemingly impossible odds? How do you adopt the formula of change towards infinite innovation?

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Relationships and relationship building are foundations of employee engagement. Linda Hill in a Harvard Business Review article on Building Effective One-on-One Relationships, cited research by John Kotter “that one of the factors that distinguished those general managers with consistently outstanding performance records from their counterparts was their ability to develop and maintain a strong network of relationships.” Work is a relationship and engagement experience. One third of Gallup’s quintessential Q12 survey asks directly about relationships to uncover engagement at work, while most of the other items are also influenced indirectly by relationship.

A relationship is a connection between two individuals. Interpersonal relationships usually involve some levels of interdependence. People in a relationship influence each other. Because of this interdependence, most things that change or impact one member of the relationship will have some level of impact on the other member. Exercising a strong “BACKbone” as a manager will have an impact on other employees. This “BACKbone” is comprised of: Bids, Authenticity, Caring, and Knowledge, elements of which are demonstrated in this module. With a BACKbone, you will excel exceedingly through positive relationships.

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Leadership is not a matter of position but of relationships, and one-on-one personal encounters are vital in building these relationships. In the end, people choose to follow your lead because they believe it is in their interests to do so, not because you claim to be a leader, or others have designated you as leader, or you have the resources and position of leadership. There’s no better illustration than the actions of George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush.

The challenge of leading leaders arises particularly in managing high-talent organisations — organisations with heavy concentrations of persons whose education, skills, wealth, and influence are substantially above the average. Managers of professional service firms face the task of leading leaders every day as they seek to manage lawyers, management consultants, physicians, investment bankers, research analysts, accountants, and portfolio managers, to name just a few, whose talents are the firm’s principal assets and who as partners may also be its owners. Heads of academic institutions, research organisations, and think tanks confront a similar task in leading professors, scientists, and scholars.

The challenge of leading leaders is also found in traditional corporations. Not only must senior managers learn to manage an increasingly educated and specialised work force, but they must also effectively lead their line managers or reports who have been chosen precisely because of their achievements, reputations, connections, wealth, or special expertise. Can these leaders be led? If yes, what would be the success recipe?

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